Connect to share and comment

N. Korea destroyed forests about 18 times the size of Manhattan

SEOUL, March 18 (Yonhap) -- North Korea has destroyed forests about 18 times the size of Manhattan for more than 10 years, data showed Tuesday, in the latest sign of deforestation in the communist country. Global Forest Watch, which is run by the Washington-based World Resources Institute, said on its website that a total of 160,515 hectares of forest were destroyed between 2000 and 2013. It also said North Korea created 13,680 hectares of forest between 2000 and 2012.

Australian PM says too much forest 'locked up'

Prime Minister Tony Abbott was accused Wednesday of mounting "a massive assault on the environment" after he warned too much Australian forest was locked up and there were enough national parks. In an address to a timber industry dinner, Abbott said he would establish a new forestry industry advisory council, calling it a sector that had been "frowned upon" for too long.

Google-backed database steps up fight on deforestation

Google, environmentalists and governments on Thursday unveiled a state-of-the-art database to track deforestation, hoping to ramp up enforcement of a major culprit behind climate change. The website, www.globalforestwatch.org, will show tree loss around the world in high resolution and with frequent updates. The data -- aimed both at policymakers and companies buying from forest areas -- will be available for free and not require much technical skill to use.

Google-backed database steps up fight on deforestation

Google, environmentalists and governments on Thursday unveiled a state-of-the-art database to track deforestation, hoping to ramp up enforcement of a major culprit behind climate change. The website, www.globalforestwatch.org, will show tree loss around the world in high resolution and with frequent updates. The data -- aimed both at policymakers and companies buying from forest areas -- will be available for free and not require much technical skill to use.

More boreal forest protected in 2013 but challenges remain: scientist

Canada has made significant strides in protecting the vast boreal forest that stretches across most of its provinces and territories, but the world's largest intact forest ecosystem still faces threats, says an environmental group. The amount of boreal forest under some form of government protection has doubled since 2007 to about 12 per cent of the total area, biologist Jeff Wells of the Boreal Songbird Initiative said recently. "That's a big rate of increase in a short time and we're hoping that's going to continue," he said.

More boreal forest protected in 2013 but challenges remain: scientist

Canada has made significant strides in protecting the vast boreal forest that stretches across most of its provinces and territories, but the world's largest intact forest ecosystem still faces threats, says an environmental group. The amount of boreal forest under some form of government protection has doubled since 2007 to about 12 per cent of the total area, biologist Jeff Wells of the Canadian Boreal Initiative said recently. "That's a big rate of increase in a short time and we're hoping that's going to continue," he said.

Kenyan leader warns against rampant destruction of forests

Kenyan leader warns against rampant destruction of forests NYAHURURU, Kenya, Dec. 7 (Xinhua) -- Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta on Saturday warned against wanton destruction of forests and announced a raft of measures aimed at curbing the rampant damage. Kenyatta said wanton destruction of forests has been occasioned by encroachment, irregular allocation of forest land, breakdown of professional forestry practice and undervaluation of forest products from state forests.

Scientists use 'eyes in the sky' to monitor Alberta forests

EDMONTON - An ambitious three-year research project is using eyes in the sky to produce what may be the clearest picture yet of the impact of the energy and forestry industries on threatened wildlife in northern Alberta. High-resolution satellite images together with information from industry will also yield the first data on what effects snowmobilers and off-roaders are having on caribou, grizzlies and wolves. "We're going to let the animals tell us when they're no longer disturbed," said biologist Gordon Stenhouse, who's overseeing the research.

Environmentalists, loggers seek consensus as Boreal Forest Agreement hits reset

OTTAWA - "We're not out of the woods yet." In her rush to explain the promise and the peril of the three-year-old Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement, Janet Sumner doesn't even pause to consider her unintended pun. Sumner, a spokeswoman for the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, is among those heralding a "reset" in a ground-breaking co-operative experiment between environmental groups and the forestry industry.

Mountain fire in Southern California forces 6,000 to flee

By Steve Gorman LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A wildfire that chased some 6,000 people from homes, vacation cabins and campgrounds in the mountains of Southern California roared through dry brush and timber for a fourth day on Thursday as crews battled to keep flames away from popular resort areas. The blaze erupted on Monday afternoon about 100 miles east of Los Angeles in the scenic but rugged San Jacinto Mountains overlooking Palm Springs, Rancho Mirage and several smaller low-lying desert towns.
Syndicate content