Connect to share and comment

As many as one in 68 U.S. kids may have autism: CDC

By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - As many as one in 68 U.S. children have autism, a 30 percent increase in just two years, U.S. health officials said on Thursday, but experts think the rise may simply reflect that parents and doctors are getting better at recognizing and diagnosing the disorder. Experts were largely unfazed by the latest numbers, which they say do not necessarily suggest increasing prevalence.

One in 68 kids has autism: US study

One in 68 US children has autism, a 30 percent rise over the last estimate released in 2012, health authorities said Thursday. The report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention raised concern and sparked calls for early screening, as well as more research and investment. Autism is a developmental disorder that has no known cause or cure. It affects people of all races with a range of difficulties in social, emotional and communication skills.

One in 68 kids has autism: US study

One in 68 children has autism, a 30 percent rise over the last estimate released in 2012, US health authorities said Thursday. The latest US data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that the "proportion of children with autism and higher IQ (is) on the rise," said a CDC statement. Previously, as many as one in 88 US children were known to have autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, a developmental disorder that recent research suggests may originate in the womb.

One in 68 kids has autism: US study

One in 68 children has autism, a 30 percent rise over the last estimate released in 2012, US health authorities said Thursday. The latest US data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that the "proportion of children with autism and higher IQ (is) on the rise," said a CDC statement. Previously, as many as one in 88 US children were known to have autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, a developmental disorder that recent research suggests may originate in the womb.

Researchers find abnormality in brain layers of autistic children

By Gene Emery NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Researchers say they have uncovered key abnormalities in some of the layers of the brains of children with autism, an indication that the foundation for the problem is laid early in fetal development. Using a unique collection of molecular tags applied to the brains after the children had died, they found patches along the convoluted surface of the brain where some usual components of cells were missing.

Autism 'patchwork' begins during pregnancy: US study

The brains of children with autism contain a built-in patchwork of defects, suggesting that the developmental disorder begins while they are growing in the womb, said a US study Wednesday. Researchers described their findings in the New England Journal of Medicine as "direct evidence" of a prenatal origin for autism, which affects as many as one in 88 children in the United States and has no known cure.

Video games offer hope for autistic children

The game over, a beaming Sawyer and Michael, both 10, cheer and give each other a high-five. It is a small but significant reaction that experts say shows how children with autism can benefit from playing some computer games. The Steuart W. Weller Ashburn Elementary School in Virginia is one of the specialized centers in the United States testing Microsoft's popular Xbox game console, equipped with "Kinect."

Antidepressants taken in pregnancy don't cause autism

By Gene Emery NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women who take a common type of antidepressant during pregnancy are not more likely to have a child with autism, according to a new study from Denmark. But children did have a higher than usual risk when their mothers took the drugs - known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) - for depression or anxiety before becoming pregnant.

Alberta judge cites lack of resources in murder-suicide of man and autistic son

EDMONTON - An Alberta judge who examined the case of a man who killed himself and his severely autistic son cites a lack of resources in the province at the time. But Judge Shelagh Creagh also wrote in her fatality inquiry report, released Friday, that "no system, including this one, is perfect." She said the family received various supports and medical care from compassionate people before the murder-suicide in September 2009.

Bedroom computers, TV may add to autism sleep issues

By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Kids with autism and related disorders are prone to sleep disturbances but a new study finds that screen time, especially in the bedroom, may make their sleep problems worse. When researchers compared boys with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to other boys, they found that all the kids with bedroom access to media slept fewer hours, but the relationship was twice as strong for the boys with autism.
Syndicate content