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OAS votes against talks on Venezuela crisis

Venezuela on Friday managed to prevent discussion of its political crisis at an Organization of American States meeting, and also stopped an opposition lawmaker from speaking to the regional body. After an eight-hour session closed to the press at the group's Washington headquarters, 22 countries voted against discussing Venezuela's increasingly violent political crisis.

OAS bars press for session on Venezuela

The Organization of American States decided Friday to close to the press a session at which a prominent Venezuelan opposition lawmaker was expected to speak to the regional body. The OAS's permanent council voted 22 to 11 in favor of barring the press, with member abstaining. "The objective of this meeting is not to turn itself into a circus for an outside audience as some representatives have shown they want to do," Brazil's ambassador said, explaining his country's vote in favor of closing the session.

Dialogue is OAS answer for Venezuela, but U.S., Panama, Canada disagree

Washington, Mar 8 (EFE).- The Organization of American States decided by a large majority to call for the continuation of a "national dialogue" in Venezuela, a formula that satisfied Caracas but not the United States, Panama and Canada, which saw it as an open validation of the response of President Nicolas Maduro to the crisis in his country.

OAS calls for peace, dialogue in Venezuela

The Organization of American States late Friday overwhelmingly approved a call for talks between the Venezuelan government and opposition, urging a return to peace in the protest-torn country. Some 20 people have been killed and around 300 injured in a wave of protests against the government of President Nicolas Maduro that began in early February. Currently the government and the political opposition are not talking.

Venezuela looks to S. American leaders as toll hits 20

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro called a meeting of South American leaders over the growing turmoil facing his country, where the death toll from a month of anti-government protests hit 20. The under-pressure leader's move Thursday came a day after he broke off relations with Panama, following its call for the rival Washington-based Organization of American States (OAS) to convene on the crisis.

Maduro wants South America to meet on Venezuela crisis

President Nicolas Maduro called Thursday for a meeting of South American leaders on the turmoil in Venezuela after more than a month of anti-government street protests. Maduro made the request to visiting Suriname President Desi Bouterse, the current head of the Union of South American Nations (Unasur), a regional bloc that does not include the United States. The move came a day after the Venezuelan leader broke off relations with Panama following its call for a meeting of the rival Washington-based Organization of American States on the crisis.

Maduro wants South America to meet on Venezuela crisis

President Nicolas Maduro on Thursday called for a meeting of South American leaders on the turmoil in Venezuela after more than a month of anti-government street protests. Maduro made the request to visiting Suriname President Desi Bouterse, the current head of the Union of South American Nations (Unasur), a regional bloc that does not include the United States. The move came a day after the Venezuelan president broke off relations with Panama after it called for a meeting of the rival Washington-based Organization of American States on the crisis.

U.S. urges calm in Venezuela, encourages dialogue

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States is working with the Organization of American States (OAS) and regional partners to urge calm in Venezuela, the White House said on Monday, as that South American country faces its most sustained unrest in a decade. White House spokesman Jay Carney expressed concern about developments in Venezuela and said the United States has made clear that with the OAS and regional partners "we are working to urge calm and encourage a genuine dialogue among all Venezuelans."

Venezuela rejects criticism on rights as biased

Venezuela rejected criticism of its human rights record Thursday, dismissing as biased a key regional body that put it on its black list as a rights abuser. Venezuela has "excellent conduct in matters of human rights," said German Saltron, its representative on the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Last year, the commission faulted Venezuela for a "lack of independence" of its courts, abuse of criminal prosecutions, and attacks on human rights activists.

Venezuela quits regional human rights court

Venezuela withdrew from a regional human rights court on Tuesday, fulfilling the wishes of late president Hugo Chavez to the dismay of activists who fear the state may commit abuses. President Nicolas Maduro wrote on Twitter that the Costa Rica-based Inter-American Court of Human Rights had become "an instrument for the protection of US geopolitical interests in (Latin) America and to persecute progressive governments."
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