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___ Global stock declines continue NEW YORK (AP) — Shaky economies and plunging currencies in the developing world are fueling a global sell-off in stocks. Fearful investors on Monday pushed prices lower across Asia and Europe, though many of the drops weren't as steep as last week. In the U.S. and in other rich countries, where economies are healthier, investors also retreated, but the selling was not as fierce. The Dow Jones industrial average slipped 41.23 points, or 0.26 per cent, to 15,837.88. The Standard

Gadget Watch: iPhone-controlled toy car game leaves Hot Wheels and tracks with rails in dust

LAS VEGAS, Nev. - So long, Hot Wheels. You just got lapped by toy race-car company Anki, which showcased its iPhone-controlled car game at Apple's developers conference in June. At the International CES gadget show in Las Vegas this week, Anki gave onlookers hands-on time with its high-tech game, Anki Drive. Several players control different toy cars on a plastic track that can roll up and go anywhere. Boy, was it fun.

1 in 3 kids using iPads in class admit to playing games: Canadian study

TORONTO - A third of Quebec students surveyed about using iPads in class admitted to playing games during school hours and an astounding 99 per cent said they found the gadgets distracting, suggests a new study based on the experiences of more than 6,000 tablet-toting kids. But even though just a few students said they felt a tablet helped them learn better, the report's co-authors still concluded that schools should invest in the technology, although cautiously.

Baby seat with iPad holder stirs controversy

By Daniel Lovering BOSTON (Reuters) - An advocacy group called on toy maker Fisher-Price to stop selling a baby seat designed to hold an iPad at the front, saying the product encourages parents to leave infants alone to watch screens that could be harmful. The bouncy seat with an iPad holder is the "ultimate electronic babysitter" and blocks a baby's view of the world, undermining the child's interaction with caregivers, said the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, based in Boston, in a statement.

LA school officials say 71 iPads went missing during trial run of $1 billion tablet rollout

LOS ANGELES, Calif. - At least 71 iPads, including 69 from a single campus, went missing last year as the Los Angeles Unified School District tested a program intended to equip every student with one of the Apple tablets, officials said. The lost devices are among iPads used in a 13-school trial run, the Los Angeles Times reported (http://lat.ms/16uB6PI ). Officials told the newspaper that since the thefts, new security measures were implemented to keep track of the tablets, which cost nearly $700 apiece and are intended to be sent home with students.

LA schools stop home use of iPads, halt rollout after students breach security on the tablets

LOS ANGELES, Calif. - It took just a week for nearly 300 students who got iPads from their Los Angeles high school to figure out how to alter the security settings so they could surf the Web and access social media sites.

Wet noses to the touchscreen, iPads go to the dogs

You may or may not be able to teach an old dog new tricks, but you can certainly try to get Fido to use an iPad. New York dog trainer Anna Jane Grossman has done just that, with success -- although a lack of apps limits the possibilities. "It's a novelty. It's just sort of a fun thing to do," Grossman told AFP at School for the Dogs, the canine classroom she runs with partner Kate Senisi near Manhattan's Union Square.

Exclusive: Spyware claims emerge in row over Chinese dissident at NYU

By Jonathan Allen NEW YORK (Reuters) - When Chinese activist Chen Guangcheng arrived in the United States in May last year he was given a fellowship at New York University, use of a Greenwich Village apartment, and a pile of gifts from supporters, including smartphones and an iPad.

Do tablets and e-readers inhibit reading comprehension?

While prior research has found that digital devices can prevent readers from absorbing text as well as the printed page, a new study counters that: researchers found that university students did equally well on reading comprehension tests when using both formats.

Do tablets and e-readers inhibit reading comprehension?

While prior research has found that digital devices can prevent readers from absorbing text as well as the printed page, a new study counters that: researchers found that university students did equally well on reading comprehension tests when using both formats.
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