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Omega-3 intake linked to signs of brain aging

By Shereen Jegtvig NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Older women with higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood had slightly less brain shrinkage than women with low fatty acid levels in a new study. The results may suggest that omega-3s protect the brain from the loss of volume that happens with normal aging and is seen more severely in people with dementia, the researchers say.

Omega-3s not tied to women's mental sharpness

By Genevra Pittman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women who consume plenty of omega-3 fatty acids may not have better thinking and memory skills as a result, according to a new study. Some researchers have suggested that fatty acids found in fish and fish oil supplements might protect against memory loss. But studies trying to test that theory have been "all over the place," said Dr. Jennifer G. Robinson from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, senior author of the new report.

Omega-3s tied to lower risk of rheumatoid arthritis

By Veronica Hackethal, MD NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women who have diets high in omega-3 fatty acids derived from fish are less likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis than those who skimp on fish, new research suggests. Researchers surveyed Swedish women about their diets and found over the course of more than seven years, long-term consumption of more than one serving of fatty fish each week was tied to a lower risk of developing the condition.

Omega-3 acids linked to child allergies, prostate risk

Omega-3 fatty acids, often taken to boost health, appear to increase the risk of childhood allergies and prostate cancer, according to two studies unveiled on Thursday. Newborns with high levels of unsaturated fats in their blood were more prone to develop an allergy than those with lower blood concentrations, according to a probe by three Swedish universities.

Fatty acids in formula linked to quick-thinking kids

By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In a study of six-year-olds, researchers found no IQ differences between kids who were fed formula supplemented with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) as infants and those who got regular formula, but the PUFA kids were notably faster at picture-matching games.

Oily fish helps fight breast cancer

Eating a portion of tuna, salmon, sardines or other oily fish once or twice a week reduces the risk of breast cancer, according to a review published by the British Medical Journal (BMJ) on Thursday. Researchers based in China looked at 26 previously published studies covering more than 800,000 volunteers in the United States, Europe and Asia whose health was monitored and who gave details about their eating habits.

Omega-3 acids not beneficial for cardiac risk group: study

Fish oil supplements rich in omega-3 fatty acids are not beneficial for patients at high risk of cardiovascular troubles and already being medicated, a study found Wednesday. In the study, carried out in 2010 in Italy with 12,513 patients, half the group took an omega-3 supplement and the other half an olive oil placebo. Previous clinical trials have suggested that these supplements could reduce cardiovascular risks for patients suffering from cardiovascular disease or who have already suffered cardiac arrest.

High mercury exposure tied to increased diabetes risk

Higher levels of mercury exposure in young adults can increase their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 65 per cent, later in life, a new study has warned.The research, led by Indiana University School of Public Health- Bloomington epidemiologist Ka He, is the first to establish the link between mercury and diabetes in humans.The main source of mercury in humans comes from the consumption of fish and shellfish, nearly all of which contain traces of mercury.

High mercury exposure tied to increased diabetes risk

Higher levels of mercury exposure in young adults can increase their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 65 per cent, later in life, a new study has warned.The research, led by Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington epidemiologist Ka He, is the first to establish the link between mercury and diabetes in humans.In the study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, the main source of mercury in humans comes from the consumption of fish and shellfish, nearly all of which contain traces of mercury.

Eating fish linked to longer life

People age 65 and older who eat fish may live an average of two years longer than people who do not consume the omega-3 fatty acids found mainly in seafood, a US study has suggested.People with higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids also had an overall risk of dying that was 27 percent lower, and a risk of dying from heart disease that was 35 percent lower than counterparts who had lower blood levels, said the study.The research was led by scientists at the Harvard School of Public Health aand was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.Researchers scanned 16 years
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