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Earth's arid zones absorb CO2, new study concludes

London, Apr 7 (EFE).- The arid zones of the planet, which constitute its most extensive ecosystems, absorb significantly greater quantities of the carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere as the quantity of CO2 increases, which helps combat climate change, a study published in Nature Climate Change said. A U.S. scientific team headed by biologist Dave Evans of the University of Washington, exposed nine plots of land in California's Mojave Desert for a period of 10 years to current CO2 levels and to those forecast for the year 2050.

US methane emissions higher than EPA numbers

US emissions of methane -- a potent greenhouse gas -- could be significantly higher than indicated in estimates by the US Environmental Protection Agency, according to a new study published Monday. The study found the EPA numbers could underestimate by as much as 50 percent the true amount of the gas being produced by the United States. The most striking discrepancy, the researchers said, was in the oil-producing south-central United States, where their results were nearly three times higher than EPA estimates.

Greenhouse gases in atmosphere hit new record

The amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere hit a record high in 2012, continuing an ever-faster rise that is driving climate change, the United Nations weather agency said Wednesday. In an annual report on greenhouse gases, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane and nitrous oxide "reached new highs" last year. jwf/nl/lc

Greenhouse gas concentration in air accelerates: U.N. report

The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere accelerated and reached a new high in 2012, the U.N. weather agency said Wednesday. The concentration of carbon dioxide reached a record level of 393.1 parts per million, up 2.2 ppm from the previous year, the World Meteorological Organization said in the Greenhouse Gas Bulletin. The 2012 increase outpaced the average annual increase over the past decade of 2.02 ppm, according to the bulletin, which said the 400 ppm threshold is expected to be reached in 2015 or 2016.

Historic greenhouse gas level sparks calls for action

The level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has surpassed 400 parts per million for the first time in human history, US monitors announced Friday, sparking new calls for action to scale back greenhouse gases. Climate scientists say the threshold is largely symbolic and has been expected for some time, but warn that it serves as an important message that people need to reverse the damage caused to the environment by the heavy use of fossil fuels.

Hashimoto clarifies remarks on "comfort women" after flak

Osaka Mayor Toru Hashimoto on Wednesday sought to clarify his remarks on a system to recruit women into sexual servitude for Japan's soldiers during World War II, saying he personally does not condone the scheme. Two days after he made controversial remarks that the so-called comfort women were "necessary to maintain discipline" in the Japanese military, Hashimoto told reporters he simply stated a fact that people at the time had that kind of view.

Global study presented at northern conference finds Arctic Ocean acidifying

An international study suggests greenhouse gases are acidifying the Arctic Ocean at a faster rate than any of the world's southern seas. "What we know is that ocean acidification is actually stronger in the Arctic than in southern waters," said Rashid Sumalia, a University of British Columbia researcher, who is one of 60 authors of the report released Monday in Bergen, Norway.

Scientists sound alarm at Arctic Ocean's rapid acidification

Scientists expressed alarm on Monday over the rapid acidification of the Arctic Ocean caused by carbon dioxide emissions, which could have dire consequences on the region's fragile ecosystem. Acidity levels in the planet's oceans have risen by 30 percent since the start of the industrial era, and are now at their highest levels in at least 55 million years, delegates said at a conference in Bergen, Norway dedicated to the subject.

Study: More pollution means more air turbulence

Researchers say that more pollution is likely to mean bumpier flights for trans-Atlantic travelers, explaining that models show increased turbulence over the north Atlantic as carbon dioxide levels rise.University of East Anglia climate expert Manoj Joshi says that scientists have long studied the impact of the carbon-heavy aviation industry on climate change.

Study: More pollution means more air turbulence

Researchers say that more pollution is likely to mean bumpier flights for trans-Atlantic travelers, explaining that models show increased turbulence over the north Atlantic as carbon dioxide levels rise.University of East Anglia climate expert Manoj Joshi says that scientists have long studied the impact of the carbon-heavy aviation industry on climate change.
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