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Rockwell Medical's iron deficiency drug succeeds in final study

By Vrinda Manocha (Reuters) - Rockwell Medical Inc said its lead experimental drug met the main goal of improving hemoglobin levels in its final late-stage trial among adult patients with chronic kidney disease. Rockwell shares rose 14 percent to $6.34 in heavy trading on the Nasdaq.

Ohio family speaks out about botched kidney transplant, says they first thought woman had died

COLUMBUS, Ohio - A family is speaking out about a botched kidney transplant in which a nurse threw out a man's viable kidney just before it was to be given to his sister, saying that at first they assumed the woman had died because her scheduled surgery ended so soon. Sarah Fudacz, 25, was to receive her brother's kidney at the University of Toledo Medical Center last August but awoke without having undergone surgery because a nurse had accidentally thrown it out.

Rockwell Medical's iron deficiency drug succeeds in trial

(Reuters) - Rockwell Medical Inc said a late-stage trial of its experimental iron deficiency drug met the main goal of improving hemoglobin levels in patients with chronic kidney disease. The company's shares rose 52 percent to $5.74 in heavy trading before the bell. The study was the first of two planned late-stage trials, and tested Soluble Ferric Pyrophosphate (SFP) in adult patients with chronic kidney disease.

Dialysis stocks hit by proposed U.S. reimbursement cuts

By Zeba Siddiqui and Ludwig Burger (Reuters) - A proposal to slash reimbursements to kidney dialysis centers in the United States drove down shares of Fresenius Medical Care AG and Davita Healthcare Partners Inc, two of the world's leading providers of dialysis services. The proposed 9.4 percent cut in Medicare reimbursements to dialysis centers, announced by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on Monday, was described by JP Morgan as "worse than even our most pessimistic scenario had envisioned".

In lab, 'bio-kidney' offers hope for renal patients

Researchers in the United States on Sunday said they had bio-engineered a kidney and transplanted it into rats, marking a step forward in a quest to help patients suffering from kidney failure. The prototype proves that a "bio-kidney" can work, emulating breakthroughs elsewhere to build replacement structures for livers, hearts and lungs, they said. Described in the journal Nature Medicine, the work entailed taking a rat kidney and stripping out its living cells using a detergent solution, leaving behind a shell made of collagen.
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