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Uighur leader fears China's 'iron fist' after knife attack

By David Ljunggren OTTAWA (Reuters) - Chinese authorities are likely to further crack down on dissent in the restive Xinjiang region after a bloody train station knife attack that Beijing blames on militants, an exiled Uighur leader said on Tuesday. China says separatists from the far western region launched the attack last Saturday, killing at least 29 people and wounding about 140. Police shot dead four of the assailants.

Uighur leader fears China's 'iron fist' after knife attack

By David Ljunggren OTTAWA (Reuters) - Chinese authorities are likely to further crack down on dissent in the restive Xinjiang region after a bloody train station knife attack that Beijing blames on militants, an exiled Uighur leader said on Tuesday. China says separatists from the far western region launched the attack last Saturday, killing at least 29 people and wounding about 140. Police shot dead four of the assailants.

China policeman tells of shooting Kunming attackers

Chinese state television on Tuesday broadcast an interview with a police officer said to have shot five knife-wielding thugs who killed and injured scores of people in a railway station attack in Kunming. Security remained tight and residents were nervous in the southwestern city, four days after the assault that state media dubbed "China's 9/11".

China policeman tells of shooting Kunming attackers

Chinese state television on Tuesday broadcast an interview with a police officer said to have shot five knife-wielding thugs who killed and injured scores of people in a railway station attack in Kunming. Security remained tight and residents were nervous in the southwestern city, four days after the assault that state media dubbed "China's 9/11".

China policeman tells of shooting Kunming attackers

Chinese state television on Tuesday broadcast an interview with a police officer said to have shot five knife-wielding thugs who killed and injured scores of people in a railway station attack in Kunming. Security remained tight and residents were nervous in the southwestern city, four days after the assault that state media dubbed "China's 9/11".

China policeman tells of shooting Kunming attackers

Chinese state television on Tuesday broadcast an interview with a police officer said to have shot five knife-wielding thugs who killed and injured scores of people in a railway station attack in Kunming. Security remained tight and residents were nervous in the southwestern city, four days after the assault that state media dubbed "China's 9/11".

Exiled Uighur leader urges calm after China attack

By Ben Blanchard BEIJING (Reuters) - A prominent exiled Uighur leader has urged China's government to respond calmly to a knife attack in the country's southwest and not "demonize" ethnic Uighurs after Beijing blamed the mass killings on extremists from the far western region of Xinjiang. Rebiya Kadeer, President of the World Uyghur Congress, also said tension could only be reduced in Xinjiang if China acknowledged rights issues faced by the large Uighur minority.

Exiled Uighur leader urges Beijing not to demonise group

An exiled Uighur rights leader Tuesday urged China against "demonising" the ethnic group after a deadly attack for which officials have blamed separatists from the western region of Xinjiang. Machete-wielding assailants clad in black slashed scores of people at a railway station in the southwestern city of Kunming late Saturday, killing 29 and wounding 143. The Munich-based World Uyghur Congress (WUC) strongly condemned the violence and its exiled president, Rebiya Kadeer, appealed to Beijing not to crack down on the minority.

Uighur group urges independent probe into Xinjiang violence

An exile Uighur group on Tuesday demanded Chinese authorities allow independent investigations into a clash in Xinjiang where eight "attackers" were shot dead by police, the latest deadly incident in the largely Muslim region. The Xinjiang regional government should "fully disclose all information" on the Monday violence and allow "an independent investigation to be conducted by international organs", the Munich-based World Uyghur Congress (WUC) said in a statement.

Uighur leader questions China's account of Tiananmen attack

By Paul Eckert WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The exiled leader of China's Uighur ethnic minority community called on Wednesday for an international investigation into an incident in which a car ploughed into pedestrians in Beijing, after Chinese authorities arrested five suspected Uighurs over the attack. The SUV vehicle burst into flames after being driven into a crowd on Tiananmen Square on Monday. The three occupants and two bystanders were killed, while dozens were injured. Police said it was a terrorist attack.
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