Connect to share and comment

New Komeito lawmaker questions Abe's drive for collective self-defense

The deputy chief of the New Komeito party cast doubt Friday about Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's move to lift an outright ban on exercising the right to collective self-defense, saying there are cases in which Japan could come to the aid of its allies like the United States as part of its own self-defense.

SDF needs more "flexibility" over security policy: ex-U.S. official

Japan's Self-Defense Forces need to have more "flexibility" as Tokyo reviews its security policy to remove a ban on exercising the right to collective self-defense, a former U.S. director of national intelligence said Thursday. "I think the Japan Self-Defense Forces need to have more flexibility to operate in accordance with their country's interests," said Dennis Blair, who also served as commander-in-chief of the U.S. Pacific Command.

Defense chief Onodera to visit Djibouti, eyes greater security role

Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera plans to visit Djibouti after the Golden Week holidays in early May, government sources said Monday, as Japan hopes to build a hub for Self-Defense Forces peacekeeping operations in Africa and the Middle East. Onodera is expected to exchange views with Djiboutian government officials on the plan, the sources said. The minister is also expected to visit conflict-stricken South Sudan where SDF personnel have been dispatched for peacekeeping operations.

Panel to urge new interpretation of int'l disputes in Constitution

A government panel on security policy plans to urge the government to interpret a constitutional ban on the use of force to settle "international disputes" as still allowing Japan to take a more active international security role, panel members said Saturday.

Panel approves bill on vice defense minister for int'l affairs

A bill to create a new post of vice defense minister for international affairs cleared a lower house panel on Tuesday as part of an organizational change to the Defense Ministry. Whoever takes the new position will assume the responsibility of representing the ministry at bilateral and multilateral security-related talks. Currently, the vice minister or a relevant director general usually attends these international talks.

Japan eyes F-35 maintenance hub under new arms export rules

The Defense Ministry proposed Thursday that Japan host a maintenance hub in the Asia-Pacific region for the F-35 stealth fighter jet developed by an international consortium, as it outlined a draft strategy to bolster the defense industry under new arms export rules. The ministry presented the outline to the ruling Liberal Democratic Party on Thursday, days after Japan adopted new principles and guidelines to relax its arms export ban, the first major overhaul in nearly half a century.

U.S. welcomes Japan's easing of weapons export ban

A U.S. government spokeswoman on Wednesday welcomed Japan's decision to ease a decades-old self-imposed ban on arms exports under the war-renouncing Constitution. "We believe this is a good step. We welcome this step," State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf told reporters, referring to the decision Tuesday which enables Japan to conditionally develop arms with the United States and other allies and access new arms technology.

Cyberspace defense unit within SDF to be established Wednesday

The Defense Ministry said Tuesday that it will launch on Wednesday a cyberspace defense unit tasked with responding to cyberattacks on the networks of the ministry and the Self-Defense Forces. The new unit will be set up within the ministry compound in Tokyo and made up of about 90 personnel from the ground, sea and air branches of the country's defense force.

Cyberspace defense unit within SDF to be established Wednesday

The Defense Ministry said Tuesday that it will launch on Wednesday a cyberspace defense unit tasked with responding to cyberattacks on the networks of the ministry and the Self-Defense Forces. The new unit will be set up within the ministry compound in Tokyo and made up of about 90 personnel from the ground, sea and air branches of the country's defense force.

Ex-gov't official slams Abe's push for collective self-defense

A former senior government official on Friday criticized Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's push to change Japan's interpretation of the Constitution to allow it to exercise the right to collective self-defense, saying the move goes against democratic principles. Kyoji Yanagisawa, who served as assistant chief Cabinet secretary from 2004 to 2009 including during Abe's first term as prime minister, said of the move, "Gaining the understanding of the public and going through the proper process (of amending the Constitution) is the basis of democracy."
Syndicate content