Connect to share and comment

Ministry changes guidelines in recognizing Minamata disease victims

The Environment Ministry notified local governments concerned Friday that it has changed guidelines to recognize people as victims of the Minamata mercury-poisoning disease, one of Japan's worst illnesses linked to industrial pollution. Under the government's criteria adopted in 1977, recognition of Minamata disease sufferers basically requires a combination of disorder of sensation plus separate symptoms.

Gov't to propose changes in recognizing Minamata disease victims

The Environment Ministry plans to propose changes to make it possible for people who suffer only from sensation disorders to be recognized as victims of the Minamata mercury-poisoning disease, officials said Friday. Under the government's criteria adopted in 1977, recognition of Minamata disease sufferers requires a combination of the disorder of sensation plus separate symptoms.

Gov't to propose changes in recognizing Minamata disease victims

The Environment Ministry plans to propose changes to make it possible for people who suffer only from sensation disorders to be recognized as victims of the Minamata mercury-poisoning disease, officials said Friday. Under the government's criteria adopted in 1977, recognition of Minamata disease sufferers requires a combination of the disorder of sensation plus separate symptoms.

Uncertified Minamata disease sufferers in Niigata file damages suit

A group of 22 unrecognized Minamata disease sufferers filed a damages suit Wednesday with the Niigata District Court, demanding the state and Showa Denko K.K., which caused the mercury-poisoning disease in the central Japan prefecture of Niigata, pay 8.8 million yen in compensation per plaintiff, or around 190 million yen in total. The plaintiffs include 10 people who were not guaranteed the latest state redress for uncertified disease sufferers.

UN environment chief see mercury use phase-out under new treaty within 3 decades

GENEVA - A new global treaty could eliminate within three decades the commercial use of mercury in everything from batteries, paints and skin-lightening creams to utility plants and small-scale gold mining, the head of the U.N.'s environment agency said Thursday. Achim Steiner, the executive director of the U.N. Environment Program, describes the Minamata Convention on Mercury as a major game-changer for a naturally occurring element that — once released into the environment through an industrial process — tends to accumulate in fish and work up the food chain.

"Minamata Convention" adopted to prevent mercury damage

Delegates from across the world adopted an international treaty Thursday to regulate the use and trade of mercury, named after a Japanese city where industrial emissions of the toxic substance caused a poisoning disease affecting thousands of people. The landmark "Minamata Convention on Mercury," aiming to prevent health damage and environmental pollution, was adopted at an international conference organized by the U.N. Environment Program in Kumamoto City in the southwestern prefecture. It has drawn 1,000 delegates from about 140 nations.

Minamata mercury treaty signed at UN conference

Delegates from some 140 countries and territories Thursday signed a United Nations treaty to control mercury near the site of Japan's worst industrial poisoning, after Tokyo pledged $2 billion to help poorer nations combat pollution. The delegates gathered in Minamata city to sign the world's first legally binding treaty on the highly toxic metal.

UN conference adopts Minamata mercury treaty

A UN conference adopted a treaty on mercury control Thursday near the site of Japan's worst industrial poisoning, as Tokyo pledged $2 billion to help poorer nations combat pollution. Delegates from some 140 countries and territories were set to formally sign the world's first legally binding treaty on the highly toxic metal, later in the day, officials said.

Minamata: The dark side of Japan's industrialisation

Minamata was the site of Japan's worst ever industrial poisoning and is regarded as the dark side of Japan's rapid modernisation during the 20th Century. For decades, a synthetic resin factory run by chemical company Chisso Corp had been dumping methylmercury into the bay of the town on southwestern Kyushu island, poisoning the marine habitat. The methylmercury accumulated in shellfish and fish in the bay. For the many people living nearby whose chief source of protein was the sea, it meant the gradual build-up in their bodies of this powerful toxin.

Global treaty against mercury poisoning adopted in Japan city

Delegates from across the world adopted on Thursday an international treaty to regulate the use and trading of mercury to prevent health damage and environmental pollution from the toxic substance. Japan proposed the pact be called the "Minamata Convention," after a city in Kumamoto Prefecture that gave its name to a mercury-poisoning disease caused by the discharge of mercury-laced wastewater by a local chemical plant.
Syndicate content