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Playwright Tom Stoppard goes back to 'day job'

Tom Stoppard is writing a new stage play. At 75, he says it might be his last because he is slower now and his "brain cells are dying in their trillions". Then again, he's not entirely sure, because he dislikes "furtive competitiveness" and as he puts it, "to hell with it, I'm not dead yet!" The prospect of one of Britain's greatest living playwrights drawing a line under his illustrious career will sadden many theatre-goers. Writing original works for the stage is what Stoppard calls his "day job".

Playwright Tom Stoppard goes back to 'day job'

Tom Stoppard is writing a new stage play. At 75, he says it might be his last because he is slower now and his "brain cells are dying in their trillions". Then again, he's not entirely sure, because he dislikes "furtive competitiveness" and as he puts it, "to hell with it, I'm not dead yet!" The prospect of one of Britain's greatest living playwrights drawing a line under his illustrious career will sadden many theatre-goers. Writing original works for the stage is what Stoppard calls his "day job".

Playwright Tom Stoppard goes back to 'day job'

Tom Stoppard is writing a new stage play. At 75, he says it might be his last because he is slower now and his "brain cells are dying in their trillions". Then again, he's not entirely sure, because he dislikes "furtive competitiveness" and as he puts it, "to hell with it, I'm not dead yet!" The prospect of one of Britain's greatest living playwrights drawing a line under his illustrious career will sadden many theatre-goers. Writing original works for the stage is what Stoppard calls his "day job".

Playwright Tom Stoppard goes back to 'day job'

Tom Stoppard is writing a new stage play. At 75, he says it might be his last because he is slower now and his "brain cells are dying in their trillions". Then again, he's not entirely sure, because he dislikes "furtive competitiveness" and as he puts it, "to hell with it, I'm not dead yet!" The prospect of one of Britain's greatest living playwrights drawing a line under his illustrious career will sadden many theatre-goers. Writing original works for the stage is what Stoppard calls his "day job".
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