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Study finds more US stay-at-home moms

More mothers in the United States are staying home, but the increase is linked more to unemployment and demographic changes than to choice, a study published Tuesday suggested. In 2012, nearly one in three mothers, or 29 percent, did not work outside the home, up from 23 percent in 1999, said the study from the Washington-based Pew Research Center. Most of the homemakers, 85 percent, indicated they stayed at home to look after their children. However, six percent said they did so because they could not find employment -- up from one percent in 2000.

More U.S. moms are staying at home with kids: study

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - More American mothers are staying at home with their children, a shift that reflects rising immigration and the fact many women are unable to find jobs after a sluggish period for the U.S. economy, a Pew analysis released on Tuesday showed. Twenty-nine percent of U.S. mothers, or about 10.4 million women, stayed at home in 2012. That is up from a low of 23 percent in 1999, and marks a turnaround from three decades of decline.

More U.S. moms are staying at home with kids: study

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - More American mothers are staying at home with their children, a trend driven in part by rising immigration and women unable to find jobs, a Pew analysis released on Tuesday showed. Twenty-nine percent of U.S. mothers, or about 10.4 million women, stayed at home in 2012, up from a low of 23 percent in 1999 in a reversal of three decades of decline.

Mothers' monitoring of media tied to kids' weight

By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Children whose mothers pay close attention to how much time they spend watching TV and playing video games tend to weigh less, according to a new study. Researchers found that mothers who were more active in their media supervision had children who were thinner at age seven and who gained less weight over the next few years.

Moms becoming one of the most plugged-in consumer cohorts in Canada: report

TORONTO - Forget the outdated stereotype of the tech-illiterate soccer mom. Twenty-first-century moms are increasingly becoming one of the most digitally savvy cohorts in Canada, according to a recently released report backed by data from measurement firm comScore and online surveys. The 2013 Canada Social Mom report, published by the parenting website BabyCenter, calls today's plugged-in moms "the most social consumers you'll meet."

Dad's housework has less dollar value than mom's: U.S. Father's Day Index

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The value of work a father typically does around the house has increased in the last year, but a mother's work is still worth far more, according to a new job survey that puts dollar figures on parental responsibilities. Ahead of Father's Day on June 16, insurance news website Insure.com on Monday released its annual "Father's Day Index."

Column: Matriarchy, patriarchy and the Masters of the Universe

By Chrystia Freeland NEW YORK (Reuters) - The past week has underscored one more way in which the lives of the super-rich are diverging from the lives of everyone else: The middle class is becoming a matriarchy, while the plutocracy remains firmly patriarchal.

Mothers are breadwinners for growing share of U.S. families

(Reuters) - Mothers are the primary or sole source of income for a growing number of U.S. families in a dramatic shift in American homes and the workplace since the 1960s, the Pew Research Center said in a study released on Wednesday. Based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the study said a record 40 percent of all U.S. households with children relied on mothers as their main or only source of income. That marked a sharp increase from 11 percent of families in 1960.
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