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2 reporters who revealed government surveillance return to US, receive journalism award

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Two reporters central to revealing the massive U.S. government surveillance effort returned to the United States on Friday for the first time since the story broke and used the occasion to praise their exiled source: Edward Snowden.

Robot Snowden promises more US spying revelations

Former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden emerged from his Russian exile Tuesday in the form of a remotely-controlled robot to promise more sensational revelations about US spying programs. The fugitive's face appeared on a screen as he maneuvered the wheeled android around a stage at the TED gathering, addressing an audience in Vancouver without ever leaving his secret hideaway. "There are absolutely more revelations to come," he said. "Some of the most important reporting to be done is yet to come."

Snowden: Proposed NSA reforms vindicate my data leaks

By Jon Herskovitz AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) - Former security contractor Edward Snowden, addressing a sympathetic crowd at a tech-heavy event in Austin, Texas, on Monday from a secret location in Russia, said proposed reforms at the National Security Agency show that he was vindicated in leaking classified material.

Snowden to speak on government spying at Texas video-conference

AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) - Former security contractor Edward Snowden, facing arrest if he steps foot on U.S. soil, will participate remotely in a panel discussion next week in Texas about governmental intrusion into privacy, conference organizers said on Tuesday. Snowden, who is in Russia, will answer questions via video conference at the South by Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin on Monday on how the U.S. National Security Agency uses technology to keep tabs on people.

No evidence Russia helped Snowden to steal U.S. secrets: Feinstein

By Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Senator Dianne Feinstein, said on Tuesday she has seen no evidence that Russian spies helped former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden steal U.S. eavesdropping secrets. The Democrat's comments on the MSNBC TV channel contrast with statements by her Republican counterpart in the House of Representative Intelligence Committee, Mike Rogers.

US officials 'want to kill me'

Fugitive intelligence leaker Edward Snowden voiced fears that US "government officials want to kill me", in a TV interview to be broadcast in Germany Sunday. The comment comes just days after Snowden's Russian lawyer Anatoly Kucherena said the American feared for his life, following a report by US website BuzzFeed of explicit threats against him from unnamed Pentagon and National Security Agency (NSA) officials.

NSA also serves economic interests: Snowden interview

The US National Security Agency (NSA) sometimes uses data it collects for economic purposes, intelligence leaker Edward Snowden reveals in an extract of an interview with a German television chain to be broadcast Sunday. "If there is information, for example on Siemens, which is in the national interest, but has nothing to do with national security, they will still use this information," said Snowden, according to the German translation of the interview on public television ARD.

Snowden sees 'no chance' for fair trial in US

Fugitive intelligence leaker Edward Snowden said Thursday he has no plans to return to the United States, because he would have "no chance" for a fair trial. "The hundred-year old law under which I've been charged... forbids a public interest defense," he said in a question-and-answer session on the "Free Snowden" website. "This is especially frustrating, because it means there's no chance to have a fair trial, and no way I can come home and make my case to a jury," he said.

Rogue US leaker Snowden says he 'acted alone'

Edward Snowden has rejected suggestions he was a Russian spy, saying in remarks published Tuesday that he acted alone in exposing US surveillance programs. "This 'Russian spy' push is absurd," the US fugitive told The New Yorker. In an interview the magazine said was carried out by "encrypted means" from Moscow, the 30-year-old said he "clearly and unambiguously acted alone, with no assistance from anyone, much less a government."

Edward Snowden 'fears for his life'

The Russian lawyer of Edward Snowden said Tuesday that the fugitive US intelligence leaker has feared for his life since reading of explicit threats against him by unnamed Pentagon officials. "There are real threats to his life out there that actually do exist," Snowden's lawyer Anatoly Kucherena told Russia's state-run Vesti 24 rolling news channel. "These statements call for physical retribution against Edward Snowden," Kucherena said.
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