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Taliban anger over commander's 'house arrest' in Pakistan

Pakistan on Wednesday denied a Taliban claim that it had failed to free former rebel commander Abdul Ghani Baradar, whose release was meant to boost Afghanistan's peace process. Baradar, often described as the Taliban's former second-in-command, was supposedly set free last month, after months of negotiations between the two governments. "However, with great regret, he is still spending days and nights locked up behind bars in worrisome health conditions which are deteriorating by the day," the Taliban said in a statement on their website.

Taliban anger over commander's house arrest in Pakistan

The Taliban on Wednesday claimed Pakistan had failed to free Abdul Ghani Baradar, the former rebel commander whose release was meant to boost Afghanistan's peace process. Baradar, often described as the Taliban's former second-in-command, was supposedly set free last month, according to the Pakistan government, after months of negotiations between the two governments "However, with great regret, he is still spending days and nights locked up behind bars in worrisome health conditions which are deteriorating by the day," the Taliban said in a statement on their website.

Pakistan releases senior Taliban commander

Pakistan released its most senior Afghan Taliban detainee Abdul Ghani Baradar on Saturday, a senior official told AFP, a move welcomed by Kabul which hopes it will encourage peace talks with the insurgents. Baradar, a one-time military chief often described as the militants' former second-in-command, was the most high profile Taliban commander detained in Pakistan. "Yes Baradar has been released," Omar Hamid, a spokesman for Pakistan's interior ministry told AFP, without elaborating on the circumstances of the release.

Mullah Baradar, former Afghan Taliban number two

Mullah Baradar, freed by Pakistan after more than three years in detention, was once the right hand man of the Afghan Taliban's supreme commander Mullah Omar. Baradar was arrested in Karachi in early 2010 in a joint operation between the CIA and Pakistani intelligence. His capture was hailed as evidence of the successful "war on terror" partnership between Washington and Islamabad which later descended into acrimony and bitterness.

Pakistan releases senior Taliban commander

Pakistan on Saturday released its most senior Afghan Taliban detainee Abdul Ghani Baradar, a senior official told AFP, in a move welcomed by Kabul who hope it will encourage peace talks with the insurgents. Baradar, a one-time military chief often described as the militants' former second-in-command, was the most high profile detained Taliban commander in Pakistan. "Yes Baradar has been released," Omar Hamid, a spokesman for Pakistan's interior ministry told AFP, without elaborating on the circumstances of the release.

Pakistan to release senior Taliban commander on Saturday

Pakistan will release on Saturday its most senior Afghan Taliban detainee, Abdul Ghani Baradar, a one-time military chief often described as the insurgents' former second-in-command. "In order to further facilitate the Afghan reconciliation process, the detained Taliban leader, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, would be released tomorrow," Pakistan's foreign ministry said in a statement on Friday. The Afghan government has long demanded that Islamabad free Baradar, whose arrest in January 2010 saw Pakistan accused of sabotaging initiatives to bring peace in war-torn Afghanistan.

Pakistan to release senior Afghan prisoner in days

Pakistan is set to release this week Abdul Ghani Baradar, a former military chief often described as the insurgents' ex-second in command. Sartaj Aziz, main advisor to Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif on national security and foreign affairs, told AFP on Monday that Baradar "will be released this week, possibly in a day or two". The Afghan government has long demanded that Islamabad free Baradar, whose arrest in January 2010 saw Pakistan accused of sabotaging initiatives to bring peace in war-torn Afghanistan.

Feared Taliban former No 2 may now hold key to Afghan peace

By Hamid Shalizi and Maria Golovnina KABUL/ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - Once a ruthless fighter and a friend of Taliban leader Mullah Mohammad Omar, Abdul Ghani Baradar may now hold the key to Afghanistan's peace - or so his minders believe. The former Taliban second-in-command was captured in Pakistan in 2010 and has since emerged as a figure Afghanistan and Pakistan believe could help persuade his former comrades to lay down their weapons and engage in peace talks.
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