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Spain's public broadcaster stages mutiny after government orders shutdown

A debt-laden Spanish television station went abruptly off the air on Friday, apparently cut off by authorities as laid-off staff protested live in defiance of orders to shut it down. The Valencia government run by the conservative Popular Party ordered the region's loss-making public broadcaster RTVV to be shut down, but staff refused to go quietly. When the regional government published "the law for the elimination, dissolution and liquidation" of RTVV on Thursday, the workers launched a live protest broadcast through the night.

Laid-off Spanish TV staff mutiny, take over broadcasts

Workers at a debt-laden Spanish television station on Friday defied an order to close the broadcaster by airing their own live protest programme. Staff at RTVV, a loss-making broadcaster owned by the government in the eastern Valencia region, refused to accept their fate quietly. When the conservative Popular Party-run Valencia government officially published "the law for the elimination, dissolution and liquidation" on Thursday, the workers launched a live protest broadcast through the night.

Workers protest closure of regional Spanish broadcaster

Workers at a Spanish regional broadcaster demonstrated Thursday on air and outside of its headquarters against the cash-strapped local government's surprise decision to close it down. The regional government of the eastern region of Valencia said Tuesday it would pull the plug on broadcaster RTVV after a court ruled the firm could not fire 1,000 of its 1,700 employees to try to stay afloat. RTVV broadcasts Radio 9 and leading television channel Canal 9 in the region, which includes the city of Valencia and the major seaside towns Alicante and Benidorm.

Broadcaster shuts as Spain local TV boom faces bust

Workers at a Spanish television channel fought against its closure Wednesday after authorities said it was financially doomed, the latest casualty of Spain's regional cash crisis. Five years after the busting of the real estate boom that hurled Spain into recession, analysts say the closure of Valencia broadcaster RTVV could herald the bursting of another bubble: Spain's 17 regional television stations.
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